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Mix and Match at Frieze Week
20151019

Mix and Match at Frieze Week

20151019

After London Fashion Week in Soho, fashion and art fans headed to Regent’s Park this past week for the Frieze: the art fair is a stomping ground for VIPs from around the world and is one of the most significant places to see and collect contemporary art. Celebrity sightings from hotel heiress Nicki Hilton Rothschild to billionaire Eli Broad are at least as important conversation topics as the record prices seen at the Frieze Week art auctions.
Art collectors queued up at the Christie’s, Phillips and Sotheby’s auction houses to rid themselves of millions of pounds. That clearly wasn’t a particularly difficult task this year: taken together, the three auction houses had artworks worth £260.8 million on their books. London’s White Cube, one of the most well-known contemporary art galleries in the UK, was jam-packed within ten minutes of the preview opening. Guests such as actor Benedict Cumberbatch and his wife Sophie Hunter could be spotted edging their way through the crowd. This was not the place to hesitate: a new work by Damien Hirst was sold within an hour – for over $1.2 million. Austrian gallery owner Thaddaeus Ropac can’t complain either: Alex Katz’s Road (2015) changed hands on the afternoon of the very first day – for an estimated $400,000. What else you should know: Crossover: At Frieze London and Frieze Masters 2015, 164 gallery owners from 27 countries traced an arc from contemporary art back through the history of art. The trend towards crossovers, towards a mix and match of styles from throughout the ages, has now reached art collectors. In focus: Peckham. Artists and people who like to experiment are drawn to this rather dull and poor area in southeast London, which is slowly starting to undergo a revival. Currently the hottest tip for collectors: go to the galleries and studios in Peckham. Unbounded: At Phillips it was a late drawing by Cy Twombly (Untitled) from 2006 that was unbounded on 14th October, being estimated at £8–12 million. Unbounded at Sotheby’s: Fontana’s La Fine di Dio. Appraised at £15–20 million.
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