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Interview: Andreas Bamesberger
11.11.2015
Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger (c) Franz Helmreich

Interview: Andreas Bamesberger

11.11.2015

Occupation Florist mit Kunstsinn
Age 41
Labour of love Life Ball flower arrangements

Contact www.zweigstelle.com

 

To every guest their flowers; to every flower its true art


Loosely based on the motto of the Secession (To every age its art. To every art its freedom.), the statement is true of creative Florist Andreas Bamesberger. Which is why his flower shop is reminiscent of a gallery: the Zweigstelle in Vienna’s Porzellangasse is a site of experimentation. The creations are more than just flower arrangements – they are artworks, made of daring combinations of the perishable and the imperishable, of the contrast between nature and material.

The Zweigstelle has been decorating Vienna’s Rathaus (city hall) for the Life Ball and presenting international stars with extravagant bouquets for 13 years. No surprise, then, that Interior Designer Colin P. Finnegan entrusted the Zweigstelle with developing the exclusive floral design for the Park Hyatt Vienna. Ever since, Bamesberger’s staff have been coming and going at the luxury hotel.  They decorate up to 20 vases in the restaurant The Bank alone. Added to that, they provide flowers for up to 150 rooms and decorations for the spa, hall, lounge and suites. “We want to polarize opinions and don’t shy away from controversial discussions,” says Bamesberger, “we’re aiming for that light-bulb moment. It’s not a case of appreciation, but awareness, of having an impact on all the senses.”

Like any other artist, Bamesberger has no time for trends or conventions. Like art, flowers should affect our mood, challenge the everyday and break its rules – otherwise it would simply be a waste.

Does a florist have a favourite flower?
That’s always the first question. As a summer baby, I spend every winter yearning for callas and tulips.

What is the most beautiful weed?
Everything that grows alongside streets, on the hard shoulders of motorways: thistles, echinacea seed heads. Combining those dry shades of brown with late-autumnal splashes of colour like dahlias…a flash of colour.

Which room should have no flowers?
I would avoid putting strongly scented flowers in any room.

To which celebrity would you like to “say something with flowers”?
Karl Lagerfeld. He is the god of aesthetics: he can do whatever he wants and will always be the first to do so. Giving him flowers is difficult – I’ve heard he only likes white flowers.

What motivates you?
The impossible. I love it when someone asks me, “How on earth did you come up with that?”

When did you recently find yourself “up a tree”?
Luckily I haven’t “got into hot water” very much recently.

Who would you make a laurel wreath for?
Ute Bock. Our politicians don’t deserve to be decorated.

Forbidden fruit tastes the sweetest. Your greatest weakness?
Probably my penchant for beautiful things – Lobmeyr glasses, everything related to tableware and dining… It’s becoming a bit of an obsession.

What do you do when your idea bears no fruit?
Throw it away. You don’t have to know how to make something beautiful; you simply have to know when something is not beautiful.

And finally, can you tell us a truism?
What’s that? Something that isn’t really right, but is somehow true anyway? That’s not scientifically sound, but is a great message? In an interview, that puts me on pretty thin ice, doesn’t it?

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