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Bottega Veneta

Feminine feminism is what you could call the latest trend spotted at Milan Fashion Week. Strong women everywhere, though note that we’re not talking about women imitating men, but rather staying true to everything that’s naturally womanly and sexy. And you’ll find forays back through the decades of female emancipation at Prada, Bottega Veneta and Kiton, too.

Bottega Veneta
Next winter, Tomas Maier is giving women strong shoulders. A flashback to the forties with a prominent quiff, feminine yet accented shoulders, narrow waistlines and pencil silhouettes. Combined with light effects during the show that seem to have been lifted from film noir. Maier’s trademark is now to launch the mens- and womenswear collections at the same time. Alongside these women – led by Eva Herzigova – what would once have been the patriarchy looks like a bunch of fresh-faced college graduates.

Prada
Miuccia Prada is a global explorer. She may strictly refuse to be political, but every single one of her collections has had some sociopolitical relevance. Although her menswear collection in January celebrated the average male, she added a bright and trippy touch to the average fabrics of the seventies. Handmade crochet, corduroy and colourful knitwear are suddenly sexy.

Kiton
The traditional Neapolitan company has embarked on an excursion to the twenties. With trouser suits and classic coats with fur trimmings on the collars. Kiton has almost exclusively plumped for black-and-white contrasts, weaving delicate blue or beige tones into the many shades of grey.

Emporio Armani
Brilliant black: after last season’s one-off in Paris, the models reappeared in Milan – though out of the black, so to speak. A pitch-black room, lots of black and white and about 100 shades of grey. Interspersed with dabs of red, pink and blue.

Etro
Even before the show, the bright bunting gave away the secret of where Veronika Etro is travelling to next: the roof of the world. A trip to Nepal? Not only! For this collection, Etro is travelling through both space and time. In it, the Western hippy culture of the ’60s meets brocade, wadded Asian jackets and Chinese embroideries – a colourful cultural celebration.

Roberto Cavalli
The creative agenda at Cavalli is currently entrusted to the hands of a nameless design team. Meaning that the show at Palazzo Crespi was less ready-to-wear than almost haute couture. Opulent patchwork, ostrich feathers, leopard print on delicate chiffon – the Cavalli style is clearly going nowhere, whoever the new creative director may be.

Bottega Veneta

Bottega Veneta

Bottega Veneta

Autumn/winter 2017

Bottega Veneta

Bottega Veneta

Bottega Veneta

Autumn/winter 2017

Bottega Veneta

Bottega Veneta

Bottega Veneta

Autumn/winter 2017

Roberto Cavalli © Giovanni Peschi

Roberto Cavalli © Giovanni Peschi

Roberto Cavalli

Autumn/winter 2017

Roberto Cavalli © Giovanni Peschi

Roberto Cavalli © Giovanni Peschi

Roberto Cavalli

Autumn/winter 2017

milan #fashionweeks: after-show is pre-show. Behind the scenes.

 

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